Radio shocker: Angry Gods slam BBC

No religion please, we’re atheists

Gods of all creeds have blasted BBC Radio bosses for their decision to broadcast a non-Godly version of Thought For The Day. This 3 minute slot traditionally contains a religious message of mind-numbing boredom, but a protest group of atheists, politicians and other unGodly people have won their campaign to broadcast non-religious messages of mind-numbing boredom instead.

The first secular Thought For The Day was delivered by Richard Dawkins, the noted scientist and God-basher. Reaction to his broadcast was muted as nobody actually listens to the programme anyway. However, a spokesdeity for the Amalgamated Union Of Top Gods warned of extreme displeasure within the Godly community, and threatened strike action. “We’ll strike them down with a thunderbolt,” he said. Further reprisals were being drawn up, and possible plagues and infestation of boils could not be ruled out, he revealed.

Prompted by the controversy, the Society For The Preservation Of Obscure Gods has urged the BBC to rethink its policy. SPOG claims the minor deities have been discriminated against. In a statement they said: “Every God should have a voice. By concentrating on big corporate religions like Christianity and ignoring the Gods of Rome, Greece, Norway and Siberia, the BBC is promoting a completely biased view of religious belief. Quetzacoatl is most displeased.”

Meanwhile, deities from the Underworld are considering their response. We understand Satan in particular is very keen to get in front of a microphone.

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